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Girlseducation-childmarriage

In partnership with the Government of Ethiopia, the DFID-funded Finote Hiwot programme is helping at least 37,500 adolescent girls, and indirectly many more, to avoid child marriage in Ethiopia.

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One of the sons pf Altansukh Purev, 38 plays on a car wreck outside their ger in the Songenkhaihan district of Ulaanbaatar.

The Songenkhaihan neighbourhood is one of the many ‘ger districts’ that have sprung up in recent years in the hills around the edge of Mongolia’s capital, Ulaanbaatar.

Tens of thousands of nomadic people from around this vast country have migrated to Ulaanbaatar over the past 20 years, often forced from their traditional way of life on the Mongolian Steppe because of the ever worsening ‘Dzud’ phenomenon.

Traditional herding families have suffered catastrophic losses of livestock during the winter ‘Dzud’, – phenomenon unique to Mongolia whereby winters can reach -58 degrees C, exacerbated by the El Nino weather phenomenon. Summer droughts compound matters by making it difficult for farmers to produce and stock enough hay and feed to provide for animals during harsh winters.

The most vulnerable families, who are entirely reliant on their cattle for food, clothing and income, lost and average of 38% of their animals in severe snow and rain storms.

Ulaanbaatar
Mongolia
Photograph by David Levene
29/7/16

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The Bayanzurktl neighbourhood is one of the many ‘ger districts’ that have sprung up in recent years in the hills around the edge of Mongolia’s capital, Ulaanbaatar.

Tens of thousands of nomadic people from around this vast country have migrated to Ulaanbaatar over the past 20 years, often forced from their traditional way of life on the Mongolian Steppe because of the ever worsening ‘Dzud’ phenomenon.

Traditional herding families have suffered catastrophic losses of livestock during the winter ‘Dzud’, – phenomenon unique to Mongolia whereby winters can reach -58 degrees C, exacerbated by the El Nino weather phenomenon. Summer droughts compound matters by making it difficult for farmers to produce and stock enough hay and feed to provide for animals during harsh winters.

The most vulnerable families, who are entirely reliant on their cattle for food, clothing and income, lost and average of 38% of their animals in severe snow and rain storms.

Ulaanbaatar
Mongolia
Photograph by David Levene
29/7/16

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A nomadic family on a motorcycle in the Sukhbaatar Region of Eastern Mongolia, on the edge of the Gobi desert.

Traditional herding families have suffered catastrophic losses of livestock during the winter ‘Dzud’, – phenomenon unique to Mongolia whereby winters can reach -58 degrees C, exacerbated by the El Nino weather phenomenon. Summer droughts compound matters by making it difficult for farmers to produce and stock enough hay and feed to provide for animals during harsh winters.

The most vulnerable families, who are entirely reliant on their cattle for food, clothing and income, lost and average of 38% of their animals in severe snow and rain storms.

Sukhbaatar
Mongolian Steppe
Mongolia
Photograph by David Levene
27/7/16

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The Bayanzurktl neighbourhood is one of the many ‘ger districts’ that have sprung up in recent years in the hills around the edge of Mongolia’s capital, Ulaanbaatar.

Tens of thousands of nomadic people from around this vast country have migrated to Ulaanbaatar over the past 20 years, often forced from their traditional way of life on the Mongolian Steppe because of the ever worsening ‘Dzud’ phenomenon.

Traditional herding families have suffered catastrophic losses of livestock during the winter ‘Dzud’, – phenomenon unique to Mongolia whereby winters can reach -58 degrees C, exacerbated by the El Nino weather phenomenon. Summer droughts compound matters by making it difficult for farmers to produce and stock enough hay and feed to provide for animals during harsh winters.

The most vulnerable families, who are entirely reliant on their cattle for food, clothing and income, lost and average of 38% of their animals in severe snow and rain storms.

Ulaanbaatar
Mongolia
Photograph by David Levene
29/7/16

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Altansukh Purev, 38 with his wife Narmandakh Sainjargal and two of their four sons inside their ger in the Songenkhaihan district of Ulaanbaatar.

The Songenkhaihan neighbourhood is one of the many ‘ger districts’ that have sprung up in recent years in the hills around the edge of Mongolia’s capital, Ulaanbaatar.

Tens of thousands of nomadic people from around this vast country have migrated to Ulaanbaatar over the past 20 years, often forced from their traditional way of life on the Mongolian Steppe because of the ever worsening ‘Dzud’ phenomenon.

Traditional herding families have suffered catastrophic losses of livestock during the winter ‘Dzud’, – phenomenon unique to Mongolia whereby winters can reach -58 degrees C, exacerbated by the El Nino weather phenomenon. Summer droughts compound matters by making it difficult for farmers to produce and stock enough hay and feed to provide for animals during harsh winters.

The most vulnerable families, who are entirely reliant on their cattle for food, clothing and income, lost and average of 38% of their animals in severe snow and rain storms.

Ulaanbaatar
Mongolia
Photograph by David Levene
29/7/16

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The Bayanzurktl neighbourhood is one of the many ‘ger districts’ that have sprung up in recent years in the hills around the edge of Mongolia’s capital, Ulaanbaatar.

Tens of thousands of nomadic people from around this vast country have migrated to Ulaanbaatar over the past 20 years, often forced from their traditional way of life on the Mongolian Steppe because of the ever worsening ‘Dzud’ phenomenon.

Traditional herding families have suffered catastrophic losses of livestock during the winter ‘Dzud’, – phenomenon unique to Mongolia whereby winters can reach -58 degrees C, exacerbated by the El Nino weather phenomenon. Summer droughts compound matters by making it difficult for farmers to produce and stock enough hay and feed to provide for animals during harsh winters.

The most vulnerable families, who are entirely reliant on their cattle for food, clothing and income, lost and average of 38% of their animals in severe snow and rain storms.

Ulaanbaatar
Mongolia
Photograph by David Levene
29/7/16

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A nomadic family outside their kitchen in the Sukhbaatar Region of Eastern Mongolia, on the edge of the Gobi desert.

Traditional herding families have suffered catastrophic losses of livestock during the winter ‘Dzud’, – phenomenon unique to Mongolia whereby winters can reach -58 degrees C, exacerbated by the El Nino weather phenomenon. Summer droughts compound matters by making it difficult for farmers to produce and stock enough hay and feed to provide for animals during harsh winters.

The most vulnerable families, who are entirely reliant on their cattle for food, clothing and income, lost and average of 38% of their animals in severe snow and rain storms.

Sukhbaatar
Mongolian Steppe
Mongolia
Photograph by David Levene
27/7/16

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Husband and wife Begzsuren Nyangaa, 68 and Buyantogtogah Damdinjav, photographed outside their home, – a traditional ger (yurt) on the Mongolian Steppe in the Sukhbaatar Region of Eastern Mongolia, on the edge of the Gobi desert.

Begzsuren Nyangaa and his family are nomadic herders who have been living off of the lands in the Sukhbaatar region of Eastern Mongolia their entire lives. He and his wife have 9 children (including 4 sets of twins) who are also all nomadic herders living nearby and continue the traditions and lifestyles of their parents and ancestors.

Traditional herding families have suffered catastrophic losses of livestock during the winter ‘Dzud’, – phenomenon unique to Mongolia whereby winters can reach -58 degrees C, exacerbated by the El Nino weather phenomenon. Summer droughts compound matters by making it difficult for farmers to produce and stock enough hay and feed to provide for animals during harsh winters.

The most vulnerable families, who are entirely reliant on their cattle for food, clothing and income, lost and average of 38% of their animals in severe snow and rain storms.

Sukhbaatar
Mongolian Steppe
Mongolia
Photograph by David Levene
27/7/16

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Amarsanaa Byambadorj, 30
Deputy Governor of Bayendelger Soum, Sukhbaatar Region.

Amarsanaa demonstrates how the land here has suffered due the disastrous cycle of harsh winters and dry summers, known as ‘Dzud’

For years traditional herding families have suffered catastrophic losses of livestock during the winter ‘Dzud’, – a phenomenon unique to Mongolia whereby winters can reach -58 degrees C, exacerbated by the El Nino weather phenomenon. Summer droughts compound matters by making it difficult for farmers to produce and stock enough hay and feed to provide for animals during harsh winters.

The most vulnerable families, who are entirely reliant on their cattle for food, clothing and income, lost an average of 38% of their animals in severe snow and rain storms.

Sukhbaatar
Mongolian Steppe
Mongolia
Photograph by David Levene
25/7/16

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5/21/16 COLOR CORRECTED. HOLD FOR MEXICO CITY CLIMATE STORY BY MICHAEL KIMMELMAN. Photographed from their neighborÌs roof is: David Vahena, 10, on the roof of his house helping his father (who is at the cistern downstairs) transfer water to the tank on the roof so they can use gravity flow to have water to bathe with. ** Credit: Josh Haner/The New York Times NYT2016092715354508C NYTCREDIT: Josh Haner/The New York Times

NOTE: DO NOT RUN WITHOUT TALKING TO MEAGHAN LOORAM AND DAVID FURST. CLIMATE CHANGE PROJECT FOR STORY BY MICHAEL KIMMELMAN.

5/28/16 Portrait of Diana with family members in Xochimilco, a neighborhood in Mexico City.. Clockwise from Diana: Josue, Abril, Valentina, Naum. Abril Contreras G˙zman, 3 (daughter of Diana) Josue Contreras G˙zman, 5 (son of Diana) Valentina Cruz G˙zman, 5 (daughter of Patricia) Naum Cruz G˙zman, 2 (son of Patricia) ** Credit: Josh Haner/The New York Times NYTCREDIT: Josh Haner/The New York Times

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5/27/16 The effects of subsidence in downtown Mexico City as shown by the undulating buildings. ** Credit: Josh Haner/The New York Times NYTCREDIT: Josh Haner/The New York Times

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5/23/16 A man named Antonio (would not give his last name) fills bottles on his 4 donkeys used to deliver water to homes in the Xochimilco neighborhood of Mexico City. ** Credit: Josh Haner/The New York Times NYTCREDIT: Josh Haner/The New York Times

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5/23/16 Gavino Mendoza, 33 years old delivering to an address in San Andres Totoltepec, a neighborhood in Mexico City, with no one home. ** Credit: Josh Haner/The New York Times NYTCREDIT: Josh Haner/The New York Times

CHD 2017 Tillis

A full room of advocates puts their training into practice as they speak with Sen. Tillis’s (R-NC) staff and urge the senator to support international family planning.

CHD 2017 Burr

A group of North Carolinians meet with Sen. Burr’s (R-NC) global health staffers to discuss the importance of the Global HER Act, funding for UNFPA, and investment in international family planning.

CHD 2017 Hassan

Constituents meet with Sen. Maggie Hassan (D-NH) to thank her for her strong support of international family planning and reproductive health.

CHD 2017 OSU

Ohio State University students who have been working with Population Connection on their campus pose for a photo at the opening reception.

Keifer, Stacie, and Brian

Policy Director Stacie Murphy and SVP Brian Dixon present the Empower Her, Empower Humanity award to Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA). Her Legislative Assistant, M.A. Keifer, accepted the award on the congresswoman’s behalf.

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Shaun in Las Vegas, Nevada proudly wears his shirt, “Ask me why women are more important than men,” while he helps people make the connection between population stabilization and global access to modern contraception.

Jessica Marcella (2)

Jessica Marcella from the National Family Planning and Reproductive Health Association discusses recent attacks on family planning availability domestically.

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Dianah Nalwangaof Uganda’s Conservation through Public Health gives Sunday’s inspiring keynote address.

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Rebecca Harrington, National Field Director, welcomes this year’s participants to Capitol Hill Days 2017.

Empower Her Award Presentation 2

Senior Policy Director Stacie Murphy presents the third annual “Empower Her, Empower Humanity” award to Congresswman Barbara Lee (her legislative assistant M.A. Kiefer accepted on her behalf).

Earth_Day_-_Earth_from_Space

Credit NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Image by Reto Stöckli (land surface, shallow water, clouds). Enhancements by Robert Simmon (ocean color, compositing, 3D globes, animation). Data and technical support: MODIS Land Group; MODIS Science Data Support Team; MODIS Atmosphere Group; MODIS Ocean Group Additional data: USGS EROS Data Center (topography); USGS Terrestrial Remote Sensing Flagstaff Field Center (Antarctica); Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (city lights).
This spectacular “blue marble” image is the most detailed true-color image of the entire Earth to date. Using a collection of satellite-based observations, scientists and visualizers stitched together months of observations of the land surface, oceans, sea ice, and clouds into a seamless, true-color mosaic of every square kilometer (.386 square mile) of our planet. These images are freely available to educators, scientists, museums, and the public. This record includes preview images and links to full resolution versions up to 21,600 pixels across.
Much of the information contained in this image came from a single remote-sensing device-NASA’s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS. Flying over 700 km above the Earth onboard the Terra satellite, MODIS provides an integrated tool for observing a variety of terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric features of the Earth. The land and coastal ocean portions of these images are based on surface observations collected from June through September 2001 and combined, or composited, every eight days to compensate for clouds that might block the sensor’s view of the surface on any single day. Two different types of ocean data were used in these images: shallow water true color data, and global ocean color (or chlorophyll) data. Topographic shading is based on the GTOPO 30 elevation dataset compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey’s EROS Data Center. MODIS observations of polar sea ice were combined with observations of Antarctica made by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s AVHRR sensor—the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The cloud image is a composite of two days of imagery collected in visible light wavelengths and a third day of thermal infra-red imagery over the poles. Global city lights, derived from 9 months of observations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, are superimposed on a darkened land surface map.

Metadata
Sensor Terra/MODIS
Visualization Date 2002-02-08
. All Sensors MODIS
. All Satellites Terra MODIS
. All Categories Collections Blue Marble Blue Marble 2002

Earth_Day_-_Earth_from_Space

Credit NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Image by Reto Stöckli (land surface, shallow water, clouds). Enhancements by Robert Simmon (ocean color, compositing, 3D globes, animation). Data and technical support: MODIS Land Group; MODIS Science Data Support Team; MODIS Atmosphere Group; MODIS Ocean Group Additional data: USGS EROS Data Center (topography); USGS Terrestrial Remote Sensing Flagstaff Field Center (Antarctica); Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (city lights).
This spectacular “blue marble” image is the most detailed true-color image of the entire Earth to date. Using a collection of satellite-based observations, scientists and visualizers stitched together months of observations of the land surface, oceans, sea ice, and clouds into a seamless, true-color mosaic of every square kilometer (.386 square mile) of our planet. These images are freely available to educators, scientists, museums, and the public. This record includes preview images and links to full resolution versions up to 21,600 pixels across.
Much of the information contained in this image came from a single remote-sensing device-NASA’s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS. Flying over 700 km above the Earth onboard the Terra satellite, MODIS provides an integrated tool for observing a variety of terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric features of the Earth. The land and coastal ocean portions of these images are based on surface observations collected from June through September 2001 and combined, or composited, every eight days to compensate for clouds that might block the sensor’s view of the surface on any single day. Two different types of ocean data were used in these images: shallow water true color data, and global ocean color (or chlorophyll) data. Topographic shading is based on the GTOPO 30 elevation dataset compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey’s EROS Data Center. MODIS observations of polar sea ice were combined with observations of Antarctica made by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s AVHRR sensor—the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The cloud image is a composite of two days of imagery collected in visible light wavelengths and a third day of thermal infra-red imagery over the poles. Global city lights, derived from 9 months of observations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, are superimposed on a darkened land surface map.

Metadata
Sensor Terra/MODIS
Visualization Date 2002-02-08
. All Sensors MODIS
. All Satellites Terra MODIS
. All Categories Collections Blue Marble Blue Marble 2002

Earth_Day_-_Earth_from_Space

Credit NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Image by Reto Stöckli (land surface, shallow water, clouds). Enhancements by Robert Simmon (ocean color, compositing, 3D globes, animation). Data and technical support: MODIS Land Group; MODIS Science Data Support Team; MODIS Atmosphere Group; MODIS Ocean Group Additional data: USGS EROS Data Center (topography); USGS Terrestrial Remote Sensing Flagstaff Field Center (Antarctica); Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (city lights).
This spectacular “blue marble” image is the most detailed true-color image of the entire Earth to date. Using a collection of satellite-based observations, scientists and visualizers stitched together months of observations of the land surface, oceans, sea ice, and clouds into a seamless, true-color mosaic of every square kilometer (.386 square mile) of our planet. These images are freely available to educators, scientists, museums, and the public. This record includes preview images and links to full resolution versions up to 21,600 pixels across.
Much of the information contained in this image came from a single remote-sensing device-NASA’s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS. Flying over 700 km above the Earth onboard the Terra satellite, MODIS provides an integrated tool for observing a variety of terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric features of the Earth. The land and coastal ocean portions of these images are based on surface observations collected from June through September 2001 and combined, or composited, every eight days to compensate for clouds that might block the sensor’s view of the surface on any single day. Two different types of ocean data were used in these images: shallow water true color data, and global ocean color (or chlorophyll) data. Topographic shading is based on the GTOPO 30 elevation dataset compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey’s EROS Data Center. MODIS observations of polar sea ice were combined with observations of Antarctica made by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s AVHRR sensor—the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The cloud image is a composite of two days of imagery collected in visible light wavelengths and a third day of thermal infra-red imagery over the poles. Global city lights, derived from 9 months of observations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, are superimposed on a darkened land surface map.

Metadata
Sensor Terra/MODIS
Visualization Date 2002-02-08
. All Sensors MODIS
. All Satellites Terra MODIS
. All Categories Collections Blue Marble Blue Marble 2002

Family planning Uganda

GOMBA DISTRICT, UGANDA – AUGUST 2016 – Prossy Namukwaya, with her husband, Abdu Nasuba, and children, stands in front of their two-room house. Prossy has planted eucalyptus seedlings to try to augment the family income so she can afford to keep her kids in school. PHOTO: Howard LaFranchi/The Christian Science Monitor

Women’s March On Washington

WASHINGTON, DC – JANUARY 21: Protesters fill Pennsylvania Avenue during a rally at the Women’s March on Washington, Jan. 21, 2017. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Supreme Court To Hear Abortion Rights Case

WASHINGTON, DC – MARCH 02: Pro-choice advocates rally outside of the Supreme Court on March 2, 2016 in Washington, DC. On Wednesday morning, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt case, where the justices will consider a Texas law requiring that clinic doctors have admitting privileges at local hospitals and that clinics upgrade their facilities to standards similar to hospitals. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

El Salvador

Women bring their products for sale to a local market on the outskirts of San Salvador, El Salvador. © 2001 Alfredo L. Fort, Courtesy of Photoshare

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UGANDA – Prossy Nakalema, in story lede; she stopped by a “pop-up” family planning information day in Gomba district southwest of Kampala PHOTO: Howard LaFranchi/The Christian Science Monitor

Family planning Uganda

GOMBA DISTRICT, UGANDA – AUGUST 2016 – Prossy Namukwaya, with her husband, Abdu Nasuba, and children, stands in front of their two-room house. Prossy has planted eucalyptus seedlings to try to augment the family income so she can afford to keep her kids in school. PHOTO: Howard LaFranchi/The Christian Science Monitor

Traffic in Lagos, Nigeria

Human and traffic congestion along Apapa-Oshodi Express Way in Lagos, Nigeria. The city population, estimated at approximately 15 million people, continues to grow quickly despite the city’s very slow infrastructure development.

Purity Ring Ceremonies

AUSTELL, GA – JUNE 15: The Purity Ring, worn by virgins and “second chance virgins” symbolizes one’s promise to remain chaste before marriage June 15, 2007 in Austell, Georgia. Young children, teenagers and their parents or guardians came together for three days to promote abstinence. Issues like STDs, peer pressure, teen pregnancy, molestation and abuse were also main topics of panel discussions. The Holywood Retreat concluded with a Purity Ring Ceremony where each participant pledged to keep their virginity or to no longer participate in sex outside of marriage by wearing a “purity ring” on their wedding finger until the day it is replaced by a wedding ring. The three day event featured ministers and lay speakers, a fashion show that illustrated how one can remain modest and fashionable, a religious concert as well as other activities that entertained a predominantly young and energetic group. (Photo by Marvi Lacar/Getty Images)

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A woman waits with her baby for a maternal-child health consultation at the hospital in Ilha de Mozambique.
© 2012 Arturo Sanabria, Courtesy of Photoshare

Mason Green (age 17) hugs his girlfriend, Erica Smith (age 14, both from Rye, Colorado) after they both signed a pledge to remain chaste until marriage. Friends Kemi Wofford (age 15, Pueblo) and Jess Briscoe (age 13, Pueblo) embrace after they made the sa

Mason Green (age 17) hugs his girlfriend, Erica Smith (age 14, both from Rye, Colorado) after they both signed a pledge to remain chaste until marriage. Friends Kemi Wofford (age 15, Pueblo) and Jess Briscoe (age 13, Pueblo) embrace after they made the same pledge at a youth event held at the New Life Church in Colorado Springs. The event was sponsored by several state religious groups and encouraged young people to be abstinent before marriage. (The Denver Post/Lyn Alweis) (Photo By Lyn Alweis/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Purity Ring Ceremonies

COLORADO SPRINGS, CO – MAY 16: Robert Moore poses for a photograph with his 9-year-old twin daughters Lauren and Elizabeth on May 16, 2008 in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The annual Father-Daughter Purity Ball, founded in 1998 by Randy and Lisa Wilson, focuses on the idea that a trustworthy and nurturing father will influence his daughter to lead a lifestyle of “integrity and purity.” (Photo by Marvi Lacar/Getty Images)

Purity Ring Ceremonies

COLORADO SPRINGS, CO – MAY 16: The Regal Daughters Ballet Company dance around the wooden cross in the ballroom of the Broadmoor Hotel on May 16, 2008 in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The annual Father-Daughter Purity Ball, founded in 1998 by Randy and Lisa Wilson, focuses on the idea that a trustworthy and nurturing father will influence his daughter to lead a lifestyle of “integrity and purity.” (Photo by Marvi Lacar/Getty Images)

Purity Ring Ceremonies

COLORADO SPRINGS, CO – MAY 16: Steve Clark reads the “Purity Covering and Covenant” to his fiance’s daughter, Ashley Avery, 17 on May 16, 2008 in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The annual Father-Daughter Purity Ball, founded in 1998 by Randy and Lisa Wilson, focuses on the idea that a trustworthy and nurturing father will influence his daughter to lead a lifestyle of “integrity and purity.” (Photo by Marvi Lacar/Getty Images)

Purity Ring Ceremonies

FRANKLIN, TN – FEBRUARY 13: Kirstie Mclaughlin, 16 celebrates with her friends after receiving her “True Love Waits” certificate on February 13, 2008 at the Full Life Assembly of God in Franklin, Tennessee. The ceremony involves teenage boys and girls and their parents who take a pledge to abstain from sex before marriage. The participants complete 5 classes before graduating in the ceremony where they receive a ring as a symbol of their promise to God and their parents and a certificate. (Photo by Marvi Lacar/Getty Images)

Purity Ring Ceremonies

FRANKLIN, TN – FEBRUARY 13: Liane Gazmeo, 16 signs her “True Love Waits” commitment certificate during a purity ring ceremony on February 13, 2008 at the Full Life Assembly of God in Franklin, Tennessee. The ceremony involves teenage boys and girls and their parents who take a pledge to abstain from sex before marriage. The participants complete 5 classes before graduating in the ceremony where they receive a ring as a symbol of their promise to God and their parents and a certificate. (Photo by Marvi Lacar/Getty Images)

Purity Ring Ceremonies

AUSTELL, GA – JUNE 14: Arriana Riley, 14, cries during a Christian concert at the Destiny World Church June 14, 2007 in Austell, Georgia. Young children, teenagers and their parents or guardians came together for three days to promote abstinence. Issues like STDs, peer pressure, teen pregnancy, molestation and abuse were also main topics of panel discussions. The Holywood Retreat concluded with a Purity Ring Ceremony where each participant pledged to keep their virginity or to no longer participate in sex outside of marriage by wearing a “purity ring” on their wedding finger until the day it is replaced by a wedding ring. The three day event featured ministers and lay speakers, a fashion show that illustrated how one can remain modest and fashionable, a religious concert as well as other activities that entertained a predominantly young and energetic group. (Photo by Marvi Lacar/Getty Images)

Purity Ring Ceremonies

AUSTELL, GA – JUNE 16: Congregants pray at the altar during the Purity Ring Ceremony at the Destiny World Church June 16, 2007 in Austell, Georgia. Young children, teenagers and their parents or guardians came together for three days to promote abstinence. Issues like STDs, peer pressure, teen pregnancy, molestation and abuse were also main topics of panel discussions. The Holywood Retreat concluded with a Purity Ring Ceremony where each participant pledged to keep their virginity or to no longer participate in sex outside of marriage by wearing a “purity ring” on their wedding finger until the day it is replaced by a wedding ring. The three day event featured ministers and lay speakers, a fashion show that illustrated how one can remain modest and fashionable, a religious concert as well as other activities that entertained a predominantly young and energetic group. (Photo by Marvi Lacar/Getty Images)

Purity Ring Ceremonies

AUSTELL, GA – JUNE 16: Virgins and “second chance virgins” raise their rings during the Purity Ring Ceremony at the Destiny World Church June 16, 2007 in Austell, Georgia. Young children, teenagers and their parents or guardians came together for three days to promote abstinence. Issues like STDs, peer pressure, teen pregnancy, molestation and abuse were also main topics of panel discussions. The Holywood Retreat concluded with a Purity Ring Ceremony where each participant pledged to keep their virginity or to no longer participate in sex outside of marriage by wearing a “purity ring” on their wedding finger until the day it is replaced by a wedding ring. The three day event featured ministers and lay speakers, a fashion show that illustrated how one can remain modest and fashionable, a religious concert as well as other activities that entertained a predominantly young and energetic group. (Photo by Marvi Lacar/Getty Images)

Purity Ring Ceremonies

AUSTELL, GA – JUNE 15: The Purity Ring, worn by virgins and “second chance virgins” symbolizes one’s promise to remain chaste before marriage June 15, 2007 in Austell, Georgia. Young children, teenagers and their parents or guardians came together for three days to promote abstinence. Issues like STDs, peer pressure, teen pregnancy, molestation and abuse were also main topics of panel discussions. The Holywood Retreat concluded with a Purity Ring Ceremony where each participant pledged to keep their virginity or to no longer participate in sex outside of marriage by wearing a “purity ring” on their wedding finger until the day it is replaced by a wedding ring. The three day event featured ministers and lay speakers, a fashion show that illustrated how one can remain modest and fashionable, a religious concert as well as other activities that entertained a predominantly young and energetic group. (Photo by Marvi Lacar/Getty Images)

Charter School

Published June 2, 2016:
Students at Opportunity Charter School participate in a class run by the Carrera program, which has cut pregnancy by 40 percent among teenagers it serves. (Zoe Greenberg/The New York Times)

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A woman and children stand among fields under storm clouds in Kwitanda, Malawi.
© 2015 Jodi-Ann Burey/VillageReach, Courtesy of Photoshare

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Class 6 girls at Don Bosco Catholic Private School listen attentively about malaria prevention. © 2016 Sarah Hoibak/VectorWorks, Courtesy of Photoshare

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Class 6 girls at Don Bosco Catholic Private School listen attentively about malaria prevention.

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Congestion at Berger Bus Stop in the Apapa area of Lagos, Nigeria, due to a long queue of fuel tanker trucks waiting to fill up.
© 2016 Kunle Ajayi, Courtesy of Photoshare

zika

This Zika health advisory at Miami International Airport are among the first in the country.

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Lauren Reiche and Sydney Rasch, law students at the William H. Bowen School of Law–University of Arkansas at Little Rock, meet with Sen. John Boozman

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Participants from Colorado meeting with Rep. Diana DeGette’s staff. Constituent lobbying offers the chance for activists to advocate for the millions of women affected by U.S. foreign policy who depend on international family planning aid. In-person meetings demonstrate a level of commitment to the issue that makes members of Congress take notice!

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There were so many Arizona State University students visiting Rep. Kyrsten Sinema’s staff that they had to hold their meeting in the hallway of the Longworth House Office Building! Pete Galvan, speaking in the photo above, says that he “would highly recommend participating to any student interested in human rights, reproductive health, or getting involved […]

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Jasmine Jackson, Rickey Leachman, and Selyna Villareal meet with Sen. Patty Murray’s staff

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Capitol Hill Days 2016 was an incredible success thanks to all of the inspiring activists who used their voices to empower women everywhere. Above: Vee Mkandawire and Mellina Chinkhondo

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Karen Hampanda and Ana Gutierrez join National Field Director Rebecca Harrington on stage for a mock constituent meeting, giving participants an idea of what to expect in their Monday meetings

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Capitol Hill Days 2016 drew 173 advocates from 27 states and 75 congressional districts who visited 153 offices in one day on Capitol Hill!

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Population Connection Action Fund presented its second annual Empower Her, Empower Humanity Award to Sen. Harry Reid for his unwavering dedication to women’s rights and access to comprehensive reproductive healthcare. The award was introduced by Brian Dixon, SVP of Media and Government Relations, and Jean Perry-Jones, longtime CHD participant and Nevada resident. It was accepted […]

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In Santo Tomás Milpas Altas, Guatemala, WINGS Family Planning Educator Evelyn registers women to receive the long-term contraceptive methods of their choice, which were predominantly Jadelle implants.
© 2015 Anna Zatonow/WINGS Guatemala, Courtesy of Photoshare

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A physician performs a routine inspection of a sick infant during a mobile health clinic organized by Yale University students on the outskirts of Tegucigalpa, Honduras.
© 2013 Damian Weikum/Yale University, Courtesy of Photoshare

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Patients on the outskirts of Tegucigalpa, Honduras, wait to be seen by health professionals at a mobile clinic organized by Yale University students. © 2013 Damian Weikum/Yale University, Courtesy of Photoshare

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Midwives in Otavalo, Ecuador learn how to take a pulse during a Midwife Training Program co-led by Jambi Huasi and GlobeMed at Loyola. © 2014 Kimberly Salazar, Courtesy of Photoshare

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Mama Juana Perugachi, a midwife working at Jambi Huasi, a primary health clinic in Otavalo, Ecuador, focused on integrating western medicine and traditional Andean practices. © 2014 Kimberly Salazar, Courtesy of Photoshare

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Community health workers conduct home visits to deliver health education, vaccines, and checkups to children under five in rural Léogâne Commune, Haiti. © 2014 Lauren Zalla, Courtesy of Photoshare

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An educator in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala, conducts an educational activity with adolescents to explain about female and male reproductive systems.
© 2014 Haydee Lemus/PASMO PSI Guatemala, Courtesy of Photoshare

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A family planning user and a health promoter discuss contraceptive methods in El Quiché, Guatemala. © 2014 Haydee Lemus/PASMO PSI Guatemala, Courtesy of Photoshare

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A mother sleeps next to her newborn baby in Georgetown, Guyana.
© 2012 Barry Reinhart/WONDOOR Global Health Program, Courtesy of Photoshare

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A maternity ward in Georgetown, Guyana.
© 2012 Barry Reinhart/WONDOOR Global Health Program, Courtesy of Photoshare

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A pediatric nurse speaks to new parents about infant care at a hospital in Central Plateau, Haiti.
© 2014 C. Hanna-Truscott/Midwives for Haiti, Courtesy of Photoshare

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Simeus holds the youngest of his four daughters in Central Plateau, Haiti. © 2014 C. Hanna-Truscott/Midwives for Haiti, Courtesy of Photoshare

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A grandfather in Central Plateau, Haiti, smiles as he holds his granddaughter, while the baby’s father exchanges smiles with his daughter. © 2014 C. Hanna-Truscott/Midwives for Haiti, Courtesy of Photoshare

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In Central Plateau, Haiti, a nurse specializing in neonatal care attends to a newborn while its mother is in post-op recovery. © 2014 C. Hanna-Truscott/Midwives for Haiti, Courtesy of Photoshare

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A pregnant woman in Central Plateau, Haiti, waits for care given by a graduate of Midwives for Haiti. © 2014 C. Hanna-Truscott/Midwives for Haiti, Courtesy of Photoshare

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Women in Central Plateau, Haiti, wait for access to skilled prenatal, postpartum, and gynecological care provided by graduates of Midwives for Haiti.
© 2014 C. Hanna-Truscott/Midwives for Haiti, Courtesy of Photoshare

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In Central Plateau, Haiti, a father holds his newborn child as his wife, a mother of five, recovers from a deep coma induced by postpartum eclamptic seizures.

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A Tzotzil woman with her child in Zinacantan, Mexico. © 2014 Arturo Sanabria, Courtesy of Photoshare

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Children in Kibera informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya – home to as many as 2 million people. The CDC is working in Kibera to carry out population-based surveillance as part of the International Emerging Infections Program.

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Children in Kibera informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya – home to as many as 2 million people. The CDC is working in Kibera to carry out population-based surveillance as part of the International Emerging Infections Program.

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Capitol Hill Days activists meet with Sen. Michael Bennet’s staff members to discuss global family planning.

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A father and son visit the local health post in the Amhara Region, Ethiopia.
© SC4CCM/JSI, Courtesy of Photoshare

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Children who live in a model village sponsored by Save the Children in rural Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. © 2014 Nicole M. Melancon, Courtesy of Photoshare.

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A health provider shows a poster that she uses to counsel women on their family planning options at a health center in Holeta in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia. © Sarah V. Harlan/JHU•CCP, Courtesy of Photoshare

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An adolescent girl waits in a Project Mercy “lie and wait home” in rural Ethiopia to give birth to her first child. © Nicole M. Melancon, Courtesy of Photoshare

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A health extension worker at the Saadamoo Health Post in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia explains the materials she uses to talk with couples about family planning. © Sarah V. Harlan/JHU•CCP, Courtesy of Photoshare

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A mother who gave birth to her baby nine days earlier rests inside her hut in Mosebo Village, Ethiopia. © Nicole M. Melancon, Courtesy of Photoshare

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A father and son visit the local health post in the Amhara Region, Ethiopia.
© SC4CCM/JSI, Courtesy of Photoshare

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A newborn at a regional hospital in Hawassa, Ethiopia. © Nicole M. Melancon, Courtesy of Photoshare

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Members of the Christian, Jewish, Muslim, other faith-based and advocacy organizations will speak out in support of abortion rights during a news conference.

PHOTOS/John Nelson

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Halima, 17, fled the occuppied town of Gwoza in northeastern Nigeria days before a military assault forced Boko Haram to retreat in March 2015. She said her mother paid a people smuggler from the nomadic Fulani tribe to lead her on bush paths to Mubi, a city which under government control.

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Halima, 17, fled the occuppied town of Gwoza in northeastern Nigeria days before a military assault forced Boko Haram to retreat in March 2015. She said her mother paid a people smuggler from the nomadic Fulani tribe to lead her on bush paths to Mubi, a city which under government control.

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Three of the schoolgirls who managed to escape when Boko Haram abducted 276 of their classmates from the Government Secondary School in Chibok, NE Nigeria, now studing at the American University of Nigeria in Yola, 30 April, 2015. Left to right Deborah, 19, Blessing, 17 and Mary, 17, said they had tried to forgive the insurgents, who they said were illiterate and uneployed. “Even though they have done so much destruction, to me punishing them will not be the best answer,” said Deborah. The girls identified themselves by middle names, for fear that their parents in Chibok might face reprisals from the insurgents.

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Members of the Christian, Jewish, Muslim, other faith-based and advocacy organizations will speak out in support of abortion rights during a news conference.

PHOTOS/John Nelson

Anti-child Rape in Liberia

Martha (not her real name) is an eleven year old rape victim, seen here on her way to a session with a caregiver, now living at a safe house in Monrovia, Liberia, October 29, 2012.
UNMIL Photo/Staton Winter

Burundi land conflict / Conflits fonciers

Burundi, Muramvya, 04 February 2015
Pierre Gahungu, born in 1940 in Muramvya, and is a victim of land conflict. In 1984, he was attacked on his way home by the son of a cousin who wanted his land. He suffered a severe injury on his head due to which he is paralyzed in his right arm. After he recovered from the attack, the family of his cousin illegally built two houses on his land and Gahungu went to court in 1989. The judgement was in his favor and the people had 180 days to leave his land. He is still waiting for this to happen, 30 years later. Meanwhile, his son died (he thinks he was murdered for his land) and he had to flee his own house for fear of being assassinated himself. His wife still lives there and cutlivates what’s left of their land. Gahungu says justice does not exist for poor people like him. “I am as poor as you can see”. He has been living in the past years in the center of Muramvya, earning a living as a cleaner and a dryer in a tailor shop.

Burundi, Muramvya, 04 février 2015
Pierre Gahungu, né en 1940 à Muramvya, est une victime du conflit foncier. En 1984, il s’est fait attaqué sur le chemin de sa maison par le fils d’un cousin qui convoitait son terrain. Il a été blessé à la tête et est paralysé du bras droit. Alors qu’il récupérait de son attaque, la famille de son cousin avait déjà fait construire deux maisons sur son terrain et Pierre Gahungu les a attaqué en justice en 1989. Le jugement a été rendu en sa faveur et ses cousins avaient 180 jours pour lui restituer ses terres. 30 ans plus tard, il attend toujours. Pendant ces années, son fils est mort (il pense qu’il a été assassiné pour son terrain) et il a du quitter sa maison par peur d’être lui aussi tué. Sa femme y vit toujours et cultive ce qui reste de leur terre. Gahungu dit qu’il n’existe pas de justice pour les pauvres comme lui. “Je suis aussi pauvre que vous pouvez vous l’imaginer en me voyant”. Il vit depuis des années dans le centre de Muramvya, subsist

Burundi land conflict / Conflits fonciers

Burundi, Muramvya, 04 February 2015
Pierre Gahungu, born in 1940 in Muramvya, and is a victim of land conflict. In 1984, he was attacked on his way home by the son of a cousin who wanted his land. He suffered a severe injury on his head due to which he is paralyzed in his right arm. After he recovered from the attack, the family of his cousin illegally built two houses on his land and Gahungu went to court in 1989. The judgement was in his favor and the people had 180 days to leave his land. He is still waiting for this to happen, 30 years later. Meanwhile, his son died (he thinks he was murdered for his land) and he had to flee his own house for fear of being assassinated himself. His wife still lives there and cutlivates what’s left of their land. Gahungu says justice does not exist for poor people like him. “I am as poor as you can see”. He has been living in the past years in the center of Muramvya, earning a living as a cleaner and a dryer in a tailor shop.

Burundi, Muramvya, 04 février 2015
Pierre Gahungu, né en 1940 à Muramvya, est une victime du conflit foncier. En 1984, il s’est fait attaqué sur le chemin de sa maison par le fils d’un cousin qui convoitait son terrain. Il a été blessé à la tête et est paralysé du bras droit. Alors qu’il récupérait de son attaque, la famille de son cousin avait déjà fait construire deux maisons sur son terrain et Pierre Gahungu les a attaqué en justice en 1989. Le jugement a été rendu en sa faveur et ses cousins avaient 180 jours pour lui restituer ses terres. 30 ans plus tard, il attend toujours. Pendant ces années, son fils est mort (il pense qu’il a été assassiné pour son terrain) et il a du quitter sa maison par peur d’être lui aussi tué. Sa femme y vit toujours et cultive ce qui reste de leur terre. Gahungu dit qu’il n’existe pas de justice pour les pauvres comme lui. “Je suis aussi pauvre que vous pouvez vous l’imaginer en me voyant”. Il vit depuis des années dans le centre de Muramvya, subsist

Burundi land conflict / Conflits fonciers

Burundi, Muramvya, 04 February 2015
Pierre Gahungu, born in 1940 in Muramvya, and is a victim of land conflict. In 1984, he was attacked on his way home by the son of a cousin who wanted his land. He suffered a severe injury on his head due to which he is paralyzed in his right arm. After he recovered from the attack, the family of his cousin illegally built two houses on his land and Gahungu went to court in 1989. The judgement was in his favor and the people had 180 days to leave his land. He is still waiting for this to happen, 30 years later. Meanwhile, his son died (he thinks he was murdered for his land) and he had to flee his own house for fear of being assassinated himself. His wife still lives there and cutlivates what’s left of their land. Gahungu says justice does not exist for poor people like him. “I am as poor as you can see”. He has been living in the past years in the center of Muramvya, earning a living as a cleaner and a dryer in a tailor shop.

Burundi, Muramvya, 04 février 2015
Pierre Gahungu, né en 1940 à Muramvya, est une victime du conflit foncier. En 1984, il s’est fait attaqué sur le chemin de sa maison par le fils d’un cousin qui convoitait son terrain. Il a été blessé à la tête et est paralysé du bras droit. Alors qu’il récupérait de son attaque, la famille de son cousin avait déjà fait construire deux maisons sur son terrain et Pierre Gahungu les a attaqué en justice en 1989. Le jugement a été rendu en sa faveur et ses cousins avaient 180 jours pour lui restituer ses terres. 30 ans plus tard, il attend toujours. Pendant ces années, son fils est mort (il pense qu’il a été assassiné pour son terrain) et il a du quitter sa maison par peur d’être lui aussi tué. Sa femme y vit toujours et cultive ce qui reste de leur terre. Gahungu dit qu’il n’existe pas de justice pour les pauvres comme lui. “Je suis aussi pauvre que vous pouvez vous l’imaginer en me voyant”. Il vit depuis des années dans le centre de Muramvya, subsist

Burundi land conflict / Conflits fonciers

Burundi, Kirundo, 2014
A woman and her sick baby are waiting for a medical consultation at the Kirundo Hospital.

Burundi, Kirundo, 2014
Une femme avec son bébé malade attend la consultation médicale à l’Hôpital de Kirundo.

Martina Bacigalupo / Agence VU

Burundi land conflict / Conflits fonciers

Burundi, Bujumbura, January 2015
The neighborhood of Kibenga, where people buy plots of land and build walls straight after, in order to protect it from other people who could claim it as theirs. They can leave their properties untouched for years while waiting to have the money to build the house. Burundi has the highest demographic density rate in all of Africa and land is rare to find.

Burundi, Bujumbura, janvier 2015
Dans le quartier de Kibenga, les gens érigent des murs autour des terres qu’ils ont acheté pour se protéger des voisins qui pourraient les réclamer. Ils peuvent laisser leur terrain en friche pendant des années, en attendant d’avoir l’argent pour faire construire une maison. Le Burundi a le plus fort taux de natalité en Afrique et les terrains sont rares.

Martina Bacigalupo / Agence VU

Burundi land conflict / Conflits fonciers

Burundi, Kayanza, 02 February 2015
Pastor André Florian in front of his Church. The Pastor, who was against contraception for many years, felt pressure because of the miserable situation into the many families were living in. In Kayanza there is the highest population rate in Burundi (in Africa), so he decided to analyse the issue of contraception further, and went for three months to Uganda to study the Bible. After which he came back convinced contraception was the only solution for Burundi to reduce the amount of conflict over land and has started sensibilising the religious congress about this issue.

Burundi, Kayanza, 02 février 2015
Le pasteur André Florian devant son église. Le pasteur, qui était opposé à la contraception depuis des années, a changé de discours du fait des conditions de vie misérable de nombreuses familles. La province de Kayanza a le plus fort taux d’habitants au kilomètre carré d’Afrique, c’est pourquoi il décida d’analyser la question de la contraception plus en avant et est parti étudier la Bible pendant trois mois en Ouganda. A son retour, il est convaincu que la contraception est la seul solution pour réduire le niveau des conflits fonciers au Burundi et tente de sensibiliser le congrés à ce sujet.

Martina Bacigalupo / Agence VU

Burundi land conflict / Conflits fonciers

Burundi, Kayanza, 02 February 2015
Lands in Kayanza province, the most highly populated province in all Africa (893.3 inhabitants per squared kilometers, according to the 2013 enquiry for the State Service of Kayanza). Each plot of land belongs to a family. Often it is not bigger than 25 squared meters for a family of 7-8 children. Moreover, the land is becoming less and less fertile because of its overexploitation.

Burundi, Kayanza, 02 février 2015
Des terres dans la province de Kayanza, la plus peuplée d’Afrique avec 893,3 habitants au kilomètre carré, selon l’enquête 2013 du service d’Etat de Kayanza. Chaque lopin de terre appartient à une famille. Souvent, la surface n’est pas plus grande que 25 mètres carrés pour une famille de 7 à 8 enfants. De plus, la terre est de moins en moins fertile du fait de sa surexploitation.

Martina Bacigalupo / Agence VU

Burundi land conflict / Conflits fonciers

Burundi, Muramvya, 04 February 2015
Pierre Gahungu, born in 1940 in Muramvya, and is a victim of land conflict. In 1984 he was attacked on his way home by the son of a cousin who wanted his land. He suffered a severe injury on his head due to which he had a semi-paralysis of his right arm. After he recovered from the attack, the family of his cousin illegally built two houses on his land and Gahungu went to justice It was 1989. The judgement was in his favor and the people had 180 days to leave his land. He is still waiting for this to happen, 30 years later. Meanwhile, his son died (he thinks he was murdered for his land) and he had to flee his own house for fear of being assassinated himself. His wife still lives there and cultivates what’s left of their land. Gahungu says justice does not exist for poor people like him. ” I am as poor as ou can see”. He has been living in the past years in the center of Muramvya, earning a living as a cleaner and a dryer in a tailor shop.

Burundi land conflict / Conflits fonciers

Burundi, Kayanza, February 2015
A woman cultivating her small plot of land in Kayanza, the most highly populated province in all Africa (893.3 inhabitants per squared kilometers, according to the 2013 inquiry for the State Service of Kayanza). Each plot of land belongs to a family. Often it is not bigger than 25 squared meters for a family of 7-8 children. Moreover, the land is becoming less and less fertile because of its overexploitation.

Martina Bacigalupo / Agence VU

Burundi land conflict / Conflits fonciers

Burundi, Ngozi, 2008
People gathering for the International UN Day for Human Rights.

Burundi, Ngozi, 2008
La population se rassemble pour assister à la journée Internationale des Nations Unies pour les Droits de l’Homme.

Martina Bacigalupo / Agence VU

Weekly photo competition winner, 12 October 2012: farmer harvests wheat experiment, Bangladesh

This week’s winner in our photo competition for CIMMYT staff and friends is Tim Krupnik, CIMMYT cropping systems agronomist. In another wonderful perspective on the variety of CIMMYT’s work around the world, this woman from Shovna village in southern Bangladesh, is harvesting her crop in an on-farm, farmer-managed experiment looking at new wheat varieties, planting dates, and nitrogen levels. The project is part of the Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA).

Photo credit: T. Krupnik/CIMMYT.

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THATTA: Aug27 – A little girl sitting under the shade of charpoy as her parents, displaced by flood in Sajawal, are busy setting makeshift home in a safe place

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A community-based family planning distribution agent with her baby outside the health facility in Shallo, Ethiopia, where she reports and gets monthly updates. Plan International is implementing a family planning project in the area. Credit:
© 2005 Virginia Lamprecht, Courtesy of Photoshare

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Elephants in Kruger National Park, South Africa.
© 2011 Arturo Sanabria, Courtesy of Photoshare

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Geles is an Arab village in Darfur where ACT-Caritas has provided wells and a variety of other services. While the ACT-Caritas Darfur Emergency Response Operation is focused primarily on responding to the needs of Darfur’s internally displaced people, it also is helping Arab villages, many of them host communities, as a contribution toward reconciliation and peace. © 2007 Paul Jeffrey, Courtesy of Photoshare

A degraded tropical coral reef.

A degraded tropical coral reef. Global warming, ocean acidification, and human impact are having a devastating effect on the planet’s coral reef systems. Photo: Whitcomberd | Dreamstime.com

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